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Tigers need diverse gene pool to surviveStanford University Original Study
 New research shows that increasing genetic diversity among the 3,000 or so tigers left on the planet, though interbreeding and other methods, may be the key to their survival as a species. Iconic symbols of power and beauty, wild tigers may roam only in stories someday soon. Their historical range has been reduced by more than 90 percent. But conservation plans that focus only on increasing numbers and preserving distinct subspecies ignore genetic diversity, according to the study. In fact, following that approach, the tiger could vanish entirely. “Numbers don’t tell the entire story,” says Elizabeth Hadly, professor in environmental biology at Stanford University and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. She is a coauthor of the study, which appears in the Journal of Heredity. That research shows that the more gene flow there is among tiger populations, the more genetic diversity is maintained and the higher the chances of species survival become. In fact, it might be possible to maintain tiger populations that preserve about 90 percent of genetic diversity. (via Tigers need diverse gene pool to survive | Futurity)
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wildcat2030:

Tigers need diverse gene pool to survive
Stanford University Original Study


New research shows that increasing genetic diversity among the 3,000 or so tigers left on the planet, though interbreeding and other methods, may be the key to their survival as a species. Iconic symbols of power and beauty, wild tigers may roam only in stories someday soon. Their historical range has been reduced by more than 90 percent. But conservation plans that focus only on increasing numbers and preserving distinct subspecies ignore genetic diversity, according to the study. In fact, following that approach, the tiger could vanish entirely. “Numbers don’t tell the entire story,” says Elizabeth Hadly, professor in environmental biology at Stanford University and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. She is a coauthor of the study, which appears in the Journal of Heredity.
That research shows that the more gene flow there is among tiger populations, the more genetic diversity is maintained and the higher the chances of species survival become. In fact, it might be possible to maintain tiger populations that preserve about 90 percent of genetic diversity. (via Tigers need diverse gene pool to survive | Futurity)

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